Deep Tissue Massage During Pregnancy

Deep tissue massage during pregnancy

Is a deep tissue massage during pregnancy safe?

Having a deep tissue massage during pregnancy is a wonderful complementary choice to improve yours, and your baby’s wellbeing. In your later stages of pregnancy it’s often the perfect treatment as your body starts to creak under the pressure of your increased weight and begin to suffer with tight hips which can lead to conditions such as sciatica. This issue only increases if you already suffer from a curvature of your spine before pregnancy, such as scoliosis, kyphosis or lordosis.

Your trained and certified pregnancy massage therapist will adapt your massage treatment according to your stage, health risks and which areas you need to be focussed on.

What is deep tissue massage during pregnancy?

It’s the same as any other time, except during pregnancy, you lie on your side and your certified prenatal massage therapist will work you from that angle asking you to turn half way through your session. Deep tissue massage uses firm pressure during pregnancy the same as it does at any other time to press deep into your muscles.

What are the health advantages of deep tissue massage during pregnancy?

Other than relieving your aching back and leg joints, reducing swelling and giving you an overall feeling of lowered anxiety and improved wellbeing, you mean?

Studies indicate that massage therapy performed while you’re pregnant is an excellent therapy for improving your sleep and decreasing the levels of the stress hormone, norepinephrine.

Prenatal massage is very effective at increasing your blood, circulation and lymphatic flow which in turn increases the amount of nutrients your body can deliver to your baby. Deep tissue prenatal massage therapy is also a great way to ease any symptoms of depression you may be trying to handle.

How do you adapt your massage techniques during pregnancy?

Your position will be different as we’ve discussed above.

But, there is a very serious side to conducting deep tissue work on pregnancy clients. Blood volume dramatically decreases when you’re pregnant. It can be by as much as 50% less. Combine this with a rise in anti-coagulants which increase to prevent hemorrhaging during delivery and you can soon see why your legs often feel heavy and sluggish. It’s also why you’re at a higher risk of blood clots in your lower legs, calves and inner thighs. We can still work you, but you’ll notice a difference in the pressure on your legs to e.g. your trunk.

Also, if you’d like your stomach massaged which many women do to ease the tension there, that’s fine. But, again, we won’t be using deep pressure. It would be uncomfortable for you anyway.

In short, your prenatal massage therapist is trained and knows where pregnant women need the most attention, and which pressure points to avoid.

I’m not bothered about deep tissue, am I better with a relaxation massage?

Yes. If you just want to zone out and you’re not experiencing any aches and pains, then you don’t want your therapist to be pressing deep, so receiving massage strokes which are more gentle such as a Swedish massage will be the right kind of therapeutic massage for you.

If you’d prefer to us work deep in some areas and lighter massage work in others, that’s fine. Just let us know.

Can I have a deep tissue massage during the first trimester of pregnancy?

No. We’re perhaps being over cautious here as we’re not aware of any definitive research to show an indisputable link between prenatal massage and miscarriage, but there is some research to suggest that it may not be the best therapy. We always want to play it safe at Essential Feeling, so if you’re in early pregnancy, we’d recommend reflexology.

To book, please use the online booking form below.

When should I avoid deep tissue massage during pregnancy?

*during your first trimester
*if you’re suffering with nausea, vomiting or morning sickness. In this instance, we can recommend pregnancy reflexology.
*you’re in the later stages of your pregnancy but you’re still at a high risk of miscarriage
*You have a high-risk pregnancy such as placental abruption (where the placenta slightly detaches from the wall of the uterus) or preterm labour