What insurance companies cover massage therapy?

The question of ‘What insurance companies cover massage therapy?’ is a big one for our clients. And the answer is there are more than you would think. If your health insurance covers you, this means that you can have the full course of your massage therapy treatments, without worrying about the cost.

The key is to check your policy and if you can’t find something which specifies, call them or drop them an email and ask.

If you’re at the point where you’re just taking out a policy and want to know what insurance companies cover massage therapy ahead of time, you can also call. Most will have a page on their website with literature which details what it covers.

They only deal with highly qualified massage professionals.

Most health insurance providers will specify that the therapist must be qualified to a high standard. And often that these massage specialists have liability insurance themselves. Your provider will want to be clear on the efficacy of your choice because if you choose badly, you’ll be claiming more. Although jumping through hoops at the outset may be tricky, you’ll be pleased of it in the end because you both win by advancing your recovery time.

You’ll be pleased to know that we meet insurer standards. We trained to ITEC standard. This stands for International Therapy Examination Council which means we are recognised around the world.

On top of this, we work with insurance companies all the time and know how they work. When we receive an insurance client, there is rarely a complication in them getting a refund and if there is, we sort it straight away.

For your own piece of mind, it’s important to know that we are qualified and experienced in a wide range of remedial massage therapies and can mix manipulative techniques to give you a tailored treatment. This means you always get the best care to improve your issues.

What’s the process for getting a massage on my health insurance policy?

First off, if you’re not sure whether it covers you, call them and ask them. They may ask for you to get a referral from your doctor or GP which isn’t an issue. Whilst you’re on the phone, we’d also ask them how many sessions your policy covers as different companies limit you to different allowances.

When you’ve had your massage with Essential Feeling, we’ll send you an official receipt. This will detail the massage you have had, and our official credentials including our unique reference code that they can use to cross check our qualifications.

You’ll notice above we mention we specify the type of massage or reflexology. This is because some techniques may be covered whilst others won’t be. If you’ve had a Swedish massage sometimes this won’t be covered, but deep tissue work will be. This is because these are the specific remedial actions which are well known to improve muscular health.

If you have an issue such as high blood pressure, and you feel that a lighter modality such as Swedish may be more beneficial, then get a referral from your medical practitioner and speak to your insurance company.

You’ll then just send this to your insurance company and they reimburse you for the cost.

Why wouldn’t I be covered for massage even if my policy stipulates I can claim?benefits of massage to present to insurance companies when trying to claim on your policy

We’re not sure on this, but we’d suggest speaking to your insurance company if you have concerns. Maybe they’ll reject claims even if you have a condition massage therapy will ease. For instance, if you’ve had an accident which has resulted in a broken arm, no amount of massage will fix the break.

What it will do is loosen tight muscles around your injury. This helps to avoid scar tissue from forming and reduce your long and short term pain. In the example of a broken bone, tight muscles can lead to tennis elbow, so putting a plan into action sooner rather than later will protect you from future injury and discomfort.

It’s situations like these whereby a doctor’s referral letter can go a long way to helping you. Think about it. This is just like a prescription that they give to the pharmacist. A direction of what they need to get you functioning better again. Often health insurance employees aren’t well versed in the body’s anatomy and how one condition can cause other problems. Healthcare professionals are, and so can point you in the right direction.

Why does my insurance regulate which massage therapists I can see under my policy?

Massage therapist’s have different levels of training. Some people in e.g. a beauty salon may well have qualified in massage therapies in a college course that only lasts one day. The participants of this course won’t be as able to help your wellness as a specialist who has done a lengthy and many advanced courses with hundreds of classroom hours and practical experience in anatomy and physiology of your muscles.

Insurance companies understand that the focus of a beauty professional is purely relaxation rather than a licence which includes rehabilitation. And therefore they specify qualifications. It’s all for your benefit even though it can seem a little tiresome. You want someone with the correct training to help you.

Will I get everything back or will I have to pay an excess?

This depends on your individual policy cover. You’ll submit the entire amount back for a claim, but their compensation may only be the difference between what you have paid for the session and your excess. This won’t be every time you claim though and so once you have this out of the way they will refund your billing in full.

Is reflexology covered in insurance policies too?

Again, this very much depends on your individual policy. Some create a holistic approach to your health and wellness, others are very medicine based. The design of your policy will determine your financial outcomes. We would always recommend explaining your private circumstances to your insurance company and discussing how you can make this work for your needs. You’ll find insurers are helpful on the phone.

Will you come out to my home?

We have premises in Gidea Park Romford. This is close to major transport routes and between Brentwood, Ilford, Chigwell and Hornchurch. We have our treatment rooms well set up with everything we need to give you the best service. For this reason, you need to come to our therapeutic centre.

So, if you’ve found out What insurance companies cover massage therapy? and you’re ready to book; text us on 07941 668456 or book online.

How to heal a hamstring strain fast.

There’s nothing worse than a pulled muscle to stop you in your sporting tracks. If you’re looking at how to heal a hamstring strain fast, then we’ve got your back. Because we know what it’s like.

Years ago now I had a boyfriend who was training to be in the Fire Brigade. Being a Firefighter was the only thing he had ever wanted to be. He had literally devoted his life to getting in.

And then disaster struck in the first weeks of his basic training. He did pulled his hamstring doing shuttle run burpees, and that was it. Over.

He got kicked out of his class and had to wait until there was another intake of new students.

If we’d known how to heal a hamstring strain fast at that point in time, perhaps that wouldn’t have happened. That said, I did meet one of my most precious friends as a result of him being put back into a different class. So every cloud.

Anyway, I digress. We’re here to discover how to heal a hamstring strain fast so you don’t have his issues.

What is a pulled muscle?

A pulled muscle, specifically hamstring in this text, is when we tear one of the muscles. If you take a look at the picture above, you’ll see the hamstring comprises three muscles.

  • Semitendinosus
  • Semimembranosus
  • Biceps femoris

If one of these is torn, then that sharp sudden pain at the back of your thigh is a sign that you’ve overstrained your hamstring.

As with tearing anything, the pain and the effects can range from mild to more serious. Let’s have a look at some symptoms, the causes and how you can treat and rehabilitate from a pulled hamstring.

Symptoms of a hamstring strain

It isn’t usually difficult to spot the signs of a hamstring strain. You won’t be able to ignore the sharp spasm which suddenly stabs the back of your thigh. This can happen whilst you’re sprinting, or perhaps whilst you’re performing a movement that requires you to stretch fast. A sudden high kick, for instance.

Hamstring strain grades:

Grade 1 relatively mild. You’ll feel tightness and a twinge when you injure yourself. There’ll be little or no swelling.

Grade 2 more serious. You will feel the sharpness of that sudden gripe as your injury occurs. You’ll probably also get some swelling and that will be the end of your gymming or game play for the day.

Grade 3 is severe. You won’t just tear a little of your muscle, it will be to half or all of your hamstring muscle. You’ll likely need crutches in order to get around. And you will feel severe pain. And weakness. You’ll get immediate swelling as your body rushes to restore the injury. It’s possible to get bruising at grade 3 too.

Not all pain is a pulled hamstring

There are other reasons why we could get pain in any muscle, for instance cramp, tendon strain or fractures can all lead to physical suffering . Be sure to get checked out by a medical professional if you’re unsure.

What causes hamstring strains?

We’ve seen how a hamstring strain is actually a tear, so let’s think about how these can be caused. It can happen in two different ways:

  • Sprinting
  • Stretch

Sprint related hamstring damage

When you sprint or if you’re just general running, your hamstring muscle works really hard. And like my example above, doing other explosive exercises such as burpees has the same effect. Just before your foot hits the ground your muscles and tissues are contracting and expanding at massive speed under impact. This fast movement is what causes the pulling which leads to a tear.

This kind of injury will usually be sudden and the tears will be lower down the muscle where it joins your tendon. Although these feel bad right at the start, they can rebuild pretty quickly.

A note here about water. We’re always banging on about this to our customers. I can’t tell you the amount of eye rolls we’ve had over the years. But listen up. Water acts as an oil to your muscles. You can avoid all of this by greasing your muscle fibres so the effect of impact is minimised.

Hamstring strains from stretching

You’ll feel these higher up the back of your thigh. These often take longer to fix purely because the blood supply to this area isn’t as good. It’s the blood supply that feeds nutrients to the area, which is why when we hurt ourself the area turns pink.

Understanding referred pain

Referred pain is when we feel discomfort in one area, but the cause is in another. So in this instance, you may feel the result of a lower back or hip injury down your leg.

How to heal a hamstring strain fast

Let’s first look at immediate treatment to help the risk of damage to hamstrings getting worse.

Immediate first aid

This is the acute stage of your hamstring strain. It usually will take 3 to 4 days depending on how bad your injury is. This is when you take it easy. You’re injured. The only thing you’re concerned about it taking care of yourself. No sports. None. Not even walking if you can help it. Use ice, compression and elevation to let the blood flow to the right places. Fast.

The role of the different types of massage at different stages in your healing process

Hamstring strain massage

At this stage, book in for a light massage treatment. This will not work the muscles but instead will stimulate blood circulation to your affected area. As days and weeks pass, then the pressure will increase.

Why bother with massage at this point?

It’s important if you want to get back your full range of motion to avoid scar tissue. Think about it this way. If you cut yourself, you see a welt when your skin pulls back together again. It’s the same with our muscles. Scar tissue depletes the strength and performance of our muscles, the long-term effects of which can be multiple. And that’s for day to day living as well as inhibiting sport’s performance.

Massage helps to break down scar tissue as well as breaking down tight muscles. Initially the more gentle touch stimulates healing through blood flow, but as time passes and your massage therapist works deeper into your muscles, it will increase your flexibility.

Hamstring strain exercises

You can stretch after the initial acute stage. This will improve your recovery as long as you don’t feel any irritation during them. If you do stop. And wait longer. It’s too soon.

When you’re doing static stretching with ease, you can move onto dynamic stretch. And then sport specific drills. Your therapist may advise you if you’re unsure.

Book your sports rehabilitation massage now

If you’d like to book in for a massage to heal your hamstring injury then you can do so online.

Prevent runner’s knee and knee pain running

What is runner’s knee?

Knee pain running is a common problem which is often called runner’s knee. It refers to a number of conditions which result in pain around the front of your knee (patellofemoral pain). This is when your kneecap briefly contacts your thigh bone. Ouch!

Overuse of your knee whilst you’re running irritates the nerves in and around your knee. The activity also overstretches the tendons which ends up, resulting in running knee pain.

It can also relate to a number of other running related injuries though.

There are non-surgical ways to treat runner’s knee pain.

What Causes Knee Pain When Running?

Knee running pain can be caused by a number of health related issues. For instance, how you stand makes a difference. If you have a collapsed arch, it may mean that your posture is off centre. This leads to more pressure on some joints than our body is naturally meant to take. And so our knee is often a point that is negatively affected through pounding the roads or treadmills. Runner's knee pain alignement

This alignment issues can also relate to unbalanced muscles. These can either be tight or weak in relation to the other muscles in the legs. This imbalance can push you off centre and increase the risk of subluxated, complete or partial kneecap dislocation. I don’t think anyone reading this will underestimate how much this can cause pain on joints, particularly in a long distance event such as a marathon.

The same effect happens if your bones aren’t aligned properly or they’re different lengths.

NOTE:

The British Journal of Sport’s Medicine notes that runners’ knee is two times more likely in women than men. This is because there is a bigger angle between a female’s thigh bone and her knee. This throws the alignment off and puts more stress on her knee, causing knee pain. 

Link between running and how you run

This is because there is a link between the distance run, the frequency and the power to knee pain. Therefore if you are looking to prevent knee pain running, then you need to balance your exercise schedule. Mix up the type of running, jogging, sprints etc with a variation in miles and distance you run along with other fitness work.

This is something that new runners often experience as they shock their system, but it is also equally important for experienced runners. If you run a lot, then you’re at risk from putting excessive stress on your knees. This can wear down the kneecap cartilage, which causes runner’s knee conditions such as chondromalacia or arthritis.

Don’t ignore the symptoms

*pain during or after running

*swelling

*stiffness

Don’t run through knee pain. This is your body warning you that something is wrong and ignoring it could cause further damage.

Runner’s Knee SymptomsIT band avoid knee pain running

The symptoms of runner’s knee vary by person; how your body is aligned, the type of training you are doing and also the specific injury you have picked up.

For example, you may suffer from any one of the following and it still be classed as runner’s knee:

*patellar knee tendonitis – inflammation of the tendons around the knee

*patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) or chondromalacia. – cartilage eroding below the kneecap. This also results in pain behind your knee cap.

*increased pain running, particularly downhill, when you climb stairs or when you’re squatting or sitting for a longer period.

*irritation of the IT Band (iliotibial) outer knee pain whilst you’re running (lateral knee pain). This is more common in long-distance runners.

*meniscus tear – sharp pain in your knee when you run.

*back of knee pain (posterior pain) through soft tissue damage. Usually this will occur when you step in a pothole or twisting your knee some other way during your run.

 

Prevent Knee Pain Running

Correct running posture to prevent knee pain running

It’s important to warm up before you exercise, particularly if you want to avoid runner’s knee. Use stretching before and after and ensure you use the correct posture to make sure you put the right amount of load on each of your joints. This enables your muscles to work optimally – for speed and health.

When you start, don’t go at it all gun’s blazing. Build your distance and your speed up gradually so your body has time to adapt to the new load it is under. Don’t start out in some old trainers, make sure you get the proper gear. If the soles of your shoes are weak, then this will contribute to the alignment issues we discussed earlier. Proper support is imperative to prevent knee pain running.

Massage is also important to preventing knee pain running. Especially before a big event such as marathon or competition like a triathlon. Leave a good few days between your deep tissue massage and your event so that your muscles have time to heal back to their optimal level, or have a lighter massage such as Swedish massage closer to the event.

Do your event.

And then after, it’s important to have another massage to ease any strain and soreness out of your legs, lower back, knees and ankles. Depending on the competition, you may also find tightness in your shoulders too so give good consideration to making sure you have enough time booked in with your massage therapist.

Massage for sports works your muscles deep to ensure that there is no residual injury or tightness and thus will help prevent knee pain running. This is both during your event when you have a massage before and after in subsequent after event exercise when you have one after the event.

The moral of the story on how to prevent runner’s knee?

Do everything in moderation and get a regular good quality massage to avoid any of the stuff we’ve talked about here today! If you’d like to visit us in Gidea Park, Romford, Essex, you can book online.

Massage aids return to normal life after chronic arthritis — Find a massage therapist near me

Do you suffer with chronic arthritis but are dubious about whether you should find a massage therapist near me? Will it be worth it? Is it all just a scam?

Read on.

Find a massage therapist near me for chronic arthritis pain

British Medical Journal – Clinical Review: Diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common cause of chronic arthritis in childhood; it is characterised by joint inflammation that often leads to joint destruction with physical disability and chronic pain that affects daily life.

During the past decade, increased understanding of the disease has improved treatment, particularly through earlier diagnosis and new treatments that help to prevent long term damage to joints. Earlier this year, the British Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology published standards of care for children and young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which outlined the importance of involving different disciplines within healthcare. One of these, in addition to massage is nutrient based benefits, including tumeric.

The British Medical Journal reviewed recent advances in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and summarised that physiotherapy is important to maintain normal muscle and joint function combined with rehabilitation-using heat or cold treatment, massage, therapeutic exercise, and splints is crucial to returning to activities of daily living again. 

Femke H M Prince, Marieke H Otten, Lisette W A van Suijlekom-Smit

If you’d like to book a massage with a qualified massage therapist (hopefully you’re now sure it was worthwhile for you to find a massage therapist near me) then give us a text on 07941 668456 and we’ll get back to you as soon as we’re free. If you’d like to read more about our massage services, then you can do so here.

Looking forward to hearing from you.