Reflexology for multiple sclerosis…

…and other long term conditions

When it comes to the support and management of patients with other long term conditions there have been studies on reflexology for MS (Multiple Sclerosis), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Dementia.

The studies in Reflexology for MS[1] show reflexology resulted in an improvement of various symptoms of MS to a statistically significant level.

No improvement was seen in the control group.

Reflexology improves spasticity in multiple sclerosis patients

Extraordinarily, the statistical improvement in spasticity (which is the continual contraction of muscles causing stiffness) and the statistically borderline improvement in muscle strength together are remarkable, as the standard drug intervention for spasticity normally results in muscle weakness with its inherent problems. The treatment of was safe with no adverse effects noted. Several other studies have agreed the beneficial effect of reflexology in this group of patients.

Parkinson’s disease

In Parkinson’s disease, the results suggest that during the therapy stage the specific outcome measure indicated improvement across all dimensions with the exception of communication which stayed the same. This could suggest that although benefits were not sustained with cessation of treatment, extended (and perhaps more frequent) treatments might continue to benefit and improve the well-being of people with Parkinson’s disease[2]

Dementia

Dementia is a costly long term condition which requires specialist care. When mild to moderate dementia[3] patients received reflexology, as compared to a massage control, the residents demonstrated significant reduction in observed pain and salivary alpha-amylase.

In conclusion

This study provides preliminary support for the efficacy of reflexology as a treatment of stress in nursing home residents. There has even been a study of reflexology on anxiety and sedation needs of patients in the ICU and reflexology was shown to greatly reduce the physiological signs of anxiety even under medical sedation, which suggests its effect is more than placebo. [4]

Sources

[1] Reflexology treatment relieves symptoms of multiple sclerosis: a randomised controlled study MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS Siev-Ner I, Gamus D, Lerner Geva L, Achiron A.2003 VOL 9 PART 4 pages 356-361

[2] Can reflexology maintain or improve the well-being of people with Parkinson’s Disease? Johns C, Blake D, and Sinclair A Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice.2010  VOL 16; NUMBER 2,  page(s) 96-100

[3] The clinical efficacy of reflexology in nursing home residents with dementia. Hodgson NA, Andersen S. Center  for Applied Research on Aging and Health, Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. nancy.hodgson@jefferson.edu

[4] Reflexology: its effects on physiological anxiety signs and sedation needs. Akin Korhan E, Khorshid L, Uyar M. Holist Nurs Pract. 2014 Jan-Feb;28(1):6-23.

Reflexology for pain

More than one study shows reflexology for pain is helpful

When reviewing the pain in cancer arena, there have been several studies that suggest that there is a place for reflexology in the care pathway. A study by Stephenson in the USA[1] in the difficult to treat group of metastatic cancer showed an ‘immediate positive effect of reflexology for patients with metastatic cancer who report pain’.

A second study from America[2] on post-operative pain and anxiety amongst patients with digestive cancer showed that together with standard postoperative analgesia, compared to a control of usual pain management, the reflexology group showed statistically less pain, anxiety and requirement for analgesia than the control group.

When we look at pain outside of the cancer field, a recent exploratory study of reflexology with pain threshold and tolerance[3] compared a sham TENS machine treatment as the control to reflexology in an ice bath pain experiment. The results showed that the reflexology treatments significantly increased pain tolerance at 60 minutes, 90 minutes, and 120 minutes. There was a reduction in heart rate over the first 60 minutes too, indicating that the results may be due to an anti-nociceptive effect. ‘These results suggest the possibility that reflexology may be useful on its own or as an adjunct to medication in the treatment of pain conditions in man’.

Issues regarding pain

One of the issues regarding pain is that it can result in the long term use of medication, of both over the counter painkillers (OTC) and prescription only medication (POM).  Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories have potential to cause stomach ulcers, kidney disorders and even liver failure and act additively when used concomitantly with other common drugs[4]. Even multiple doses of Paracetamol and/ or the prophylactic medicines can produce drug induced refractory headaches[5]. Reflexology for pain can improve this.

Another study for menstrual pain

In a small study of students with dysmenorrhea a comparison was made to Ibuprofen. The Ibuprofen was prescribed 400mg every 8 hours over 3 days for three cycles. The reflexology group received 10 treatments over the first 2 cycles, but no treatment during the third cycle. Reflexology was associated with a greater reduction of menstrual pain duration and intensity across all three cycles as compared to the Ibuprofen treated group[6].

Reflexology and migraines

Published studies of reflexology indicate that it aids with Migraines. Lafuenta et al compared reflexology to Flunarizine, a drug often used in the treatment of headache. 32 patients with a variety of headaches including Migraines were randomised into two groups, one received reflexology and a placebo tablet, while the other received Flunarizine and an unspecific friction massage of the arms to control for human contact. The frequency and pain intensity was measured and the results show that the reflexology was at least as effective as the Flunarizine which could be particularly useful where pharmacological intervention is contraindicated[7].

It continues…

In a study comparing reflexology to segmental massage in females with Migraine Wojciech et al looked at the frequency, intensity and duration of Migraine attacks. All variables were reduced at the end of the intervention with both therapies. At three months post intervention, the variables were both still improved with both therapies, however, if the Friedman test is applied the results were much more favourable to the reflexology group[8].

Angina and heart failure

Finally, a study was carried out on Migraines induced by nitroglycerin which is used in the treatment of acute and chronic angina and congestive heart failure.  Reflexology was applied to the big toes, which under reflexology theory is representative of the head; compared to application of pressure to another irrelevant part of the heel or no treatment at all as a control.

This study was on all males which is unusual for Migraine research but which is reflected the original presenting condition of angina and congestive heart failure. The results showed a highly statistical difference for the reflexology group (p=0.000) using the numeric rating scale for pain as compared to the other two groups.[9]

Sources

[1]The effect of foot Reflexology for pain in patients with metastatic cancer. Stephenson N1Dalton JACarlson JAppl Nurs Res. 2003 Nov;16(4):284-6.

[2]Effects of Reflexotherapy on Acute Postoperative Pain and Anxiety Among Patients With Digestive Cancer Shiow-Luan Tsay,  Hsiao-Ling Chen,  Su-Chiu Chen, Hung-Ru Lin, Kuan-Chia Lin Cancer Nursing Vol. 31, No. 2, 2008

[3] Exploratory study on the efficacy of reflexology for pain threshold and tolerance using an ice-pain experiment and sham TENS control Carol A. Samuel Ivor S. Ebenezer, Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice Volume 19, Issue 2 , Pages 57-62, May 2013

[4] Analgesic, antiulcer, antithrombotic drugs and organ damage: a population-based case-control study. Battelli D1, Riccardi R, Piscaglia AC, Stefanelli ML, Mussoni L, Zani A, Vitale V, Monachese N. Minerva Med. 2015 Dec;106(6):323-31.

[5] https://www.nationalmigrainecentre.org.uk/migraine-and-headaches/migraine-and-headache-factsheets/medication-overuse-headche/

[6] Comparing the effects of reflexology methods and Ibuprofen administration on dysmenorrhea in female students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Valiani M, Babaei E, Heshmat R, Zare Z.Iran J Nurs Midwifery Res. 2010 Dec;15(Suppl 1):371-8.

[7] Reflexology for pain in comparison to prophylactic flunarizine treatment (powerful migraine medication) on patients suffering from cephalalgia (permanent) headache. Lafuente A., Noguera M., Puy C., Molins A., Titus F. and Sanz F. Dr. Annemarie Kesselring, SBK, Institut fur Pflegeforschung, Bern.

[8] Effects of feet reflexology versus segmental massage in reducing pain and its intensity, frequency and duration of the attacks in females with migraine: a pilot study. Wojciech K, Pawel L, Halina RZ.J Tradit Chin Med. 2017 Apr;37(2):214-9.

[9] Effect of applying reflexology massage on nitroglycerin-induced migraine-type headache: A placebo-controlled clinical trial. Imani N, Shams SA, Radfar M, Ghavami H1, Khalkhali HR.Agri. 2018 Jul;30(3):116-122.

Reflexology for cancer patients — evidence based research

Reflexology for Cancer Patients

In the field of Reflexology for cancer patients and cancer care,  in 2009 62% of cancer units in the UK provided reflexology and it was second only to counselling[1]. This vulnerable and very unwell group have nothing but good things to say about reflexology massage cancer care, with the only complaint being lack of availability of appointments:

‘The improvement in my lower back pain has been staggering’

‘My sleep has improved and I feel relaxed and content’

‘I found having treatments helped me focus and be more positive and able to deal with incidents that made me feel fragile.’[2]

When Reflexology for cancer patients was evaluated in a busy London hospital there was a 28% change in perceived well-being. [3]

‘Patients appear to perceive complementary therapies as enhancing compassionate care and providing comfort during an extremely difficult clinical experience.’

Even in a palliative care setting all participants in the Reflexology for cancer patients felt their quality of life had improved and words such as relaxed and comforted were used while symptoms were reduced.  [4]

When considering mental health, a study of reflexology on the psychological effect of having breast cancer[5] resulted in a statistical improvement in quality of life even at one month after the completion of the intervention. This difference was to a level that was calculated as being clinically worthwhile. While a small cross over trial (the patients were their own control) from America in lung and breast cancer patients showed that both groups of patients in the Reflexology for cancer patients study had a significant decrease in anxiety after reflexology.[6]

Read more about Reflexology for Cancer Patients at Essential Feeling.

Sources on Reflexology for cancer patients

[1] Availability of complementary and alternative medicine for people with cancer in the British National Health Service: results of a national survey. Egan B1, Gage H, Hood J, Poole K, McDowell C, Maguire G, Storey L. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2012 May;18(2):75-80

[2] Is reflexology as effective as aromatherapy massage for symptom relief in an adult outpatient oncology population? Dyer J, Thomas K, Sandsund C, Shaw C. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2013 Aug;19(3):139-46

[3] Effects of complementary therapies in cancer care. Briscoe J, Browne N (2013) Nursing Times; 109: 41, 18-20.

[4] Does reflexology impact on cancer patients’ quality of life? Hodgson H. Nurs Stand. 2000 Apr 19-25;14(31):33-8.

[5]A randomised, controlled trial of the psychological effects of reflexology in early breast cancer. Sharp DM1, Walker MB, Chaturvedi A, Upadhyay S, Hamid A, Walker AA, Bateman JS, Braid F, Ellwood K, Hebblewhite C, Hope T, Lines M, Walker LG. Eur J Cancer. 2010 Jan;46(2):312-22.

[6] The Effects of Foot Reflexology on Anxiety and Pain in Patients With Breast and Lung Cancer ONCOLOGY NURSING FORUM Stephenson, N. L. Weinrich, S. P. Tavakolil, A. S. 2000 VOL 27; PART 1 , page(s)  67-76

Read also about how garlic benefits can help you with cancer.

Reflexology science based medicine

Reflexology Science Based Medicine (EBM)

Whenever reflexology is mentioned within a clinical setting the question that always arises is where’s the evidence? If only large randomised trials are used to make science based medicine decisions then it is absolutely accepted that reflexology does not have that level of evidence. But the original Sackett definition of evidence based medicine (EBM) is:

‘the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of the individual patient. It means integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research.’ [1]

This definition actually does not define EBM as only requiring  large Randomised Controlled Trials but more that the best research available together with a clinical decision should be brought into the decision making process for individual patient care. The clinical expertise originates with the health professionals involved but the patient also brings with them personal preferences and expectations that are involved in the decision-making process. It further goes on to say, that the evidence by itself, does not make the decision, but it can help support the patient care process.

The full integration of these three components into clinical decisions enhances the opportunity for optimal clinical outcomes and quality of life. EBM actually melds very well with the NHS England ‘Putting patients first’ policy, that not only should the best decision be made for that individual patient but that they themselves should be involved in the making of that decision.

With this in mind, while the best evidence about Reflexology science based medicine is not a large and comprehensive collection of research studies, neither is reflexology solely specific to one medical condition.

The very nature of reflexology as a complementary therapy means it is not condition limited,  it can be used across many areas where patients are feeling stressed, anxious or in pain and/ or need a boost to their quality of life and wellbeing. This lack of specificity does not bode well for research meta-analyses, and when meta-analysis for complementary therapies is undertaken it usually results in a negative outcome. This does not necessarily mean that reflexology has no worth but rather that its action is too heterogeneous to be successfully analysed using this system.[2]

If, however, the existing best evidence;  that of the separate research studies are taken into account,  then it can be seen that there is potential in this low cost, supportive therapy. Potential that could help care for patients in a way that perhaps is missing from the present-day NHS.

 

[1] Science-based medicine David L. Sackett Seminars in Perinatology Volume 21, Issue 1, February 1997, Pages 3-5

 

[2] Meta-analysis: Its strengths and limitations Esteban Walker, Adrian V. Hernandez, Micheal W. Kattan Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. 2008 June;75(6):431-439

Long term conditions

Conditions, especially long term ones, can be a complex vortex of illness, pain, anxiety, depression, emotions and needs.[1] Standard medical care does not cope well with complexity as it rather follows straight paths as compared to swirling spirals. There is evidence that people with long term conditions receive poorer quality of care than those with a single condition.[2]

 

[1]http://www.nhsconfed.org/~/media/Confederation/Files/Publications/Documents/Investing%20in%20emotional%20and%20psychological%20wellbeing%20for%20patients%20with%20long-Term%20condtions%2016%20April%20final%20for%20website.PDF

[2] https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/projects/mental-health-and-long-term-conditions-cost-co-morbidity

Reflexology Q&A — Certified Reflexologist near me

Karen, your MAR reflexologist at Essential Feeling, Romford answers your reflexology based questions so you can find a Certified Reflexologist near me.

If you’re looking for a Certified Reflexologist near me but you’re not sure where to start, then here are a list of the common questions answered. That way you can be sure that when you book with Karen MAR at Essential Feeling Gidea Park, Romford, you’re making the right choice.

1. What qualification in reflexology do you hold, and when did you qualify?

I qualified with the ABC awards which is recognised by the AOR (Association of Reflexology) the professional reflexology association as a quality training. I have a Level 3 Diploma in Reflexology and Anatomy and Physiology. 

Karen reflexology qualification certificate. Certified Reflexologist near me

On top of this, Karen has also continued her professional development and holds many other training certificates in e.g. fertility reflexology, pregnancy reflexology, spinal reflexology, nerve reflexology and cancer care. She is also a certified nutritionist and counsellor.

2. Do you belong to any professional associations?

As noted above, Karen is a member of the AOR. Membership of a reputable professional association such as the Association of Reflexologists is a strong indicator of a continuing commitment to high professional standards. Don’t be afraid to check this association out – they are reputable and have a Code of Practice and Ethics that all members ascribe to, a robust complaints procedure, will require all practitioners to be fully insured and will require all practitioners to continue their learning and professional development throughout their career.

MAR status means Karen has passed a rigorous quality control process before they can even enter membership, and they are required to continue their learning about reflexology throughout their career.

3. Where do you give treatments?

Essential Feeling have treatment rooms at their home address. They are separate to the house in an annex so you won’t have to endure a TV blasting or dogs barking during your session.

We have free off street parking on the drive in allocated parking spaces right outside the entrance to the treatment rooms. 

4. How much do you charge for treatments?

All of our sessions at Essential Feeling are the same price. It’s £60 per hour and the minimum time is one hour. We won’t compromise on this, we want to do a great job for you, otherwise it’s our reputation at stake and cutting down the time affects the quality of your outcome.

We work on an appointment basis, from 7am in the morning to 10pm at night, 7 days.

5. How long should I allow for an appointment?

Your slot is one hour and please do check out our policy on this, here.

6. What do I need to bring with me to my appointment?

Nothing, just yourself. It’s easier if you are wearing something that is easy to remove on your feet, but it’s no issue if not. The main thing is to make sure that you return the online consultation form well in advance of your session so that your therapist has the time to give it good consideration before you come along.

7. How firm or gentle are your techniques?

If you have a preference then let us know. It’s no issue to adapt. The pressure we would naturally use will be different depending on why you are coming. If we need to stimulate something, then we’ll use a more firm pressure than if we’re working with you on cancer care.

8. What medium do you use on the feet?

Karen uses a specialist reflexology wax by choice.  Please let her know in advance of your session if you have any allergies.

If you’d like to go ahead and book with Karen, a Certified Reflexologist near me in Gidea Park, Romford, you can drop her a text on 07757 946023 or if you’d like more information on the types of reflexology she offers, then more information is here.

Reflexology — how it works

How reflexology works
How reflexology works

What is Reflexology?

Reflexology is a non-invasive complementary health therapy that can be effective in promoting deep relaxation and wellbeing; by reducing stress in people’s lives can be key in optimising good health and building resilience. It is a touch therapy that is based on the theory that different points on the feet, lower leg, hands, face or ears correspond with different areas of the body and reflexologists work these points and areas. At Essential Feeling, Karen specialises in foot reflexology, but also sometimes works on hands instead of or as well as your feet. This is because some conditions are better treated by using different methods.

However reflexology is viewed, there can be no doubt that what it does provide is a period of time for relaxation where the client has one to one attention and supportive touch in an empathetic listening environment. Reflexology can be used safely alongside standard healthcare to promote better health for their clients.

To get a better idea what reflexology looks like, feel free to watch our video.

What’s the main theory behind reflexology?Reflexology how it works

The theory of reflexology is that all the systems and organs of the whole body are mirrored or reflected in smaller peripheral areas, for example the feet, hands, ears and face. These can be seen in relation to the feet by following the link to our interactive reflexology map (right).

Back in the 1920’s investigative studies regarding this concept allowed the first Western reflexology foot map to be produced. Since that time the other anatomical areas have been mapped allowing this model to be applied to the hands, ears and face.

The reflexologist simply works those reflected areas with their sensitive fingers, aiming to bring those areas back to balance and therefore aiding the body to work as well as it can. Reflexology very much works on an individual basis, the reflexologist provides professional facilitation of your body’s own potential for well-being.

While there are few available scientific studies specifically into how reflexology works, there are scientific studies that support the potential positive effects that can be achieved by touch. Essentially, according to the advertising standards council, as a reflexologist, we can only claim the directly proven effects of reflexology. These being listed in the image below.

Benefits reflexology

So how can you claim reflexology helps with all the other health issues?

Because firstly, we’ve worked with clients who we know this has helped, so that’s our personal experience. But, here’s the underlying issues that the ASA can’t support for legal reasons.

When our body undergoes changes, then the knock on effects are massive.

Take the example above of ‘aids sleep.’ This has huge knock on benefits because our body uses the downtime when we’re napping to fix itself. So, all of the stresses and strains of the day that cause a negative imbalance on our system are cleansed while our body has extra energy from not having to move us around.

This benefit is massive. If we’re starting the next day with a ‘fitter’ body then the negative effects of everything else that we load onto our system are so much less impactful.

A brief history of Western reflexology

Whilst the art of reflexology dates back to Ancient Egypt, India and China, this therapy was not introduced to the West until Dr William Fitzgerald developed ‘Zone therapy’ in the early 1900s. He believed that reflex areas on the feet and hands were linked to other areas and organs of the body within the same zone.

In the 1930’s, Eunice Ingham further developed this zone therapy into what is known as reflexology. Her opinion was that congestion or tension in any part of the foot is mirrored in the corresponding part of the body.

 

Is reflexology suitable for me?

Reflexology is a therapy which can be received by anyone at any age, from newborn babies to those receiving end of life care, and everyone in between. However, there may occasionally be times when it is not suitable to provide a treatment. If you’re in any doubt, give Karen a call or text on 07757 946023 and ask! Please note: reflexology should not be used as an alternative to seeking medical advice.

Will reflexology help me?

Well trained reflexologists do not claim to cure, diagnose or prescribe. Reflexology is a very individual treatment which is tailored to you as a whole person, taking into account both physical and non-physical factors that might be affecting your wellbeing. Some people find it works for them – some don’t. The best way to find out is to try it!

The theory is that reflexology helps the body to restore its balance naturally. Usually, after a treatment your tension may be reduced and you might feel relaxed. You might also notice yourself sleeping better and find your mood and sense of wellbeing improving. You may also find that other aspects improve too; however, this happens on an individual basis.

There have been some positive research projects carried out with reflexology; however, as yet, there is not a large enough body of evidence for us to make clinical claims of effectiveness.

With ever increasing levels of stress in everyday life, it is important for people to take more responsibility for their own healthcare needs. Reflexology may be one of the ways to mitigate the stresses of modern life.

 

What happens when I go for a treatment?

A full medical history will be requested on your first treatment, and you will be asked to sign a consent form for treatment. This information will be kept confidential. Reflexology is a very easy therapy to receive; depending on the type of reflexology, the most clothing that will have to be removed for a treatment to take place will be your socks and shoes.

The therapist will then use their hands to apply pressure to the feet, lower leg, hands, ears or face, depending on the type of reflexology chosen. You may feel areas of transient discomfort during the treatment, but generally the experience should be relaxing.

The therapist may recommend a course of treatments.

 

How will I feel after a reflexology treatment?

It is useful to give feedback to the reflexologist as this may show the response of your body to treatment. This in turn might help the reflexologist to tailor a treatment plan specific to your needs. After one or two treatments your body may respond in a very noticeable way. Most people note a sense of well-being and relaxation; however, sometimes people report feeling lethargic, nauseous or tearful, but this is usually transitory and reflexologists believe that it is part of the healing process.

We hope that helps to answer the questions about reflexology and how it works. If you’re interested in booking a session, we’re in Gidea Pak, Romford, Essex. You can text Karen MAR on 07757 946023 or book online.

Reflexology aids cancer patients

Living with cancer can be tough. Particularly when you’re suffering with peripheral neurpathy. Reflexology in the management of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy: A pilot randomized controlled trial Author links open overlay panel Seda Kurta Gul Beyaz Canb

Highlights

• Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) can limit a patient’s quality of life functions.

• Reflexology increases the level of the quality of life functions related to CIPN.

• Reflexology can be recommended to the patients.

Abstract Purpose

The current experimental study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of reflexology on the management of symptoms and functions of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in cancer patients.

Method

This study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial in 60 patients (30 experimental and 30 control patients) who had chemotherapy-induced Grade II-IV peripheral neuropathy complaints from July 2013 to November 2015. Data were collected using the patient identification form, European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (EORTC-CIPN-20) form, and BPI (used for related chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy symptoms).

Results

The majority of the patients were being treated for gastrointestinal or breast cancer and were primarily receiving Eloxatine- or taxane-based treatment. It was found that reflexology applications did not lead to differences in either group in terms of peripheral neuropathy severity and incidence (p > 0.05) and only led to improvement in sensory functions in the experimental group (p < 0.05).

Conclusions

It was determined that reflexology is an effective method in the management of patients’ sensory functions related to CIPN.

Elsevier European Journal of Oncology Nursing Volume 32, February 2018, Pages 12-19 European Journal of Oncology Nursing

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Interested how to help cancer? Read about garlic benefits.

Massage aids return to normal life after chronic arthritis — Find a massage therapist near me

Do you suffer with chronic arthritis but are dubious about whether you should find a massage therapist near me? Will it be worth it? Is it all just a scam?

Read on.

Find a massage therapist near me for chronic arthritis pain

British Medical Journal – Clinical Review: Diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common cause of chronic arthritis in childhood; it is characterised by joint inflammation that often leads to joint destruction with physical disability and chronic pain that affects daily life.

During the past decade, increased understanding of the disease has improved treatment, particularly through earlier diagnosis and new treatments that help to prevent long term damage to joints. Earlier this year, the British Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology published standards of care for children and young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which outlined the importance of involving different disciplines within healthcare. One of these, in addition to massage is nutrient based benefits, including tumeric.

The British Medical Journal reviewed recent advances in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and summarised that physiotherapy is important to maintain normal muscle and joint function combined with rehabilitation-using heat or cold treatment, massage, therapeutic exercise, and splints is crucial to returning to activities of daily living again. 

Femke H M Prince, Marieke H Otten, Lisette W A van Suijlekom-Smit

If you’d like to book a massage with a qualified massage therapist (hopefully you’re now sure it was worthwhile for you to find a massage therapist near me) then give us a text on 07941 668456 and we’ll get back to you as soon as we’re free. If you’d like to read more about our massage services, then you can do so here.

Looking forward to hearing from you.

Office chair based massage such as Indian head massage, keeps costs low & spirits high

Indian head massage near me helps workers & their employers

If you’re thinking how? And you’re not sure whether to bother searching further for Indian head massage near me, then read on.

With the economy struggling, and public outrage at a peak over lavish corporate expenditures, some companies are still treating their

Migraine relief head massage
Teenage boy laying on a massage table, having a head massage

employees well. They’re doing it cheaply, right from the office by hiring massage therapists to come to their businesses and provide employees with Indian head massage at or near their desks.

”The massages we provide on site in local companies are not the type of luxury that you might find at a resort spa,” said Karen Botha of Essential Feeling holistic therapy specialists based in Gidea Park near Romford, Essex and provider of office based massages in the area. “The cost is much lower, and employees get a significant stress relief and morale boost.”

And these are stressful times. With corporate revenue and earnings down sharply over this prolonged recession, times have rarely been worse for corporate expenditures on employees. However, companies are finding that office massage such as Indian head massage can be a cost-effective way to reward employees and de-stress the work environment.

“We need a way to reward our employees, to show them that they are worthwhile, even if the amount of money we can spend on them to do this has been reduced,” said Diana Cortijo with World Bank, the international financing and development institution and a recent recipient of office massage. “Chair massage offers us a low-price way to bring the luxury of massage to our employees.”

Office massages such as Indian head massage, in addition to being low-cost, is also low-maintenance for companies. Generally, therapists such as Essential Feeling for instance will provide their own transport to the business, and bring their own massage chair and supplies. They then perform massage on employees on-site, with the employees fully clothed in an ergonomically relaxed, seated position. Most on site massage happens at an impromptu station, often setup in an unused meeting room in the office.

“It really takes the stress out,” said Helene Mangones of Graf Repetti & Co, LLP, another recent office massage recipient “all of a sudden bigger projects seem easier to tackle. And the stress that builds up during the day is relieved, allowing for an easier finish to the day, and even the current week and month.” This is why they thought it was a good idea to make the search for Indian head massage near me.

This stress reduction could ultimately lead to increases in productivity and a rise in profits. Stress is one of the leading causes of lowered productivity in the workplace. One estimate puts direct stress-related costs to businesses in the US at £200 billion per annum. Studies by the Touch Research Institute at the University of Miami have shown stress reduction, mood and immune system benefits from massage therapy.

“We notice that things can get a little stressed, especially given the current economic environment,” Cortijo, of World Bank, said. “Office massage helps keep our workers’ minds and bodies fresh, and doesn’t stretch our budget to do it.”

Contact us now on 077941 668456 to find out how we can help you.

Reflexology aids fertility — reflexology for fertility near me

Looking for reflexology for fertility near me but need some help deciding? Check out this case study

After three years of trying for a second child, Kath and Murray Chapman had almost given up hope.

Doctors had told them Mrs Chapman had a hormone problem which meant fertility treatment would be a waste of time.

But the 40- year-old mother remembered she had read somewhere that reflexology could help with infertility.

With nothing to lose, she had three months of foot massage and, at the end of her course, was delighted to hear that her hormone levels had returned to normal.

She soon became pregnant and gave birth to second son Fraser five months ago. While doctors insist there is nothing to prove the alternative therapy was responsible, she is sure it worked.

Mrs Chapman, who also has a four-year-old son called Jake, said: ‘I am convinced I wouldn’t have become pregnant without the reflexologist’s help. I was absolutely shocked, but obviously delighted, to find I was pregnant after being told we couldn’t have a second child. It’s a dream come true.’

Mrs Chapman, from Deepcar, Sheffield, said she was ‘devastated’ to be told she would never conceive again.

‘I was told that there was no point in attempting IVF treatment because it would be a waste so I would have to resign myself to the fact that we couldn’t have another baby,’ she added. A hormone test – which indicates if a woman is entering the menopause – showed levels were too high, suggesting her ovaries had stopped producing enough oestrogen, which controls the reproductive cycle.

To become pregnant, a woman needs a hormone rating of ten or below but Mrs Chapman’s was above 25. Following reflexology, however, it dropped to below eight.

‘ I told the doctors about the reflexology but they dismissed it and just said it was possible that hormone levels can drop when you become more relaxed and less anxious.

‘The effect of the reflexology was amazing. It seemed to relax me so much. I became pregnant quite quickly and everything went smoothly. The doctors never admitted that the reflexology had anything to do with it but I have no doubt at all.’

Mr Chapman, who runs a catering recruitment business with his wife, said: ‘We’re just delighted now the family is complete.’ Reflexologist Sue Calvert said: ‘The technique works on pressure points on the feet which correspond to different parts of the body. Massaging these areas helps to restore balance to the body.’

There is little accepted medical evidence to back up Reflexologists’ claims. One trial in Denmark examined 108 women with an average age of 30 who had been trying to conceive for up to seven years. Many dropped out of the trial, but 19 of the remaining 61 conceived within six months of completing the treatment.

Polly Hall, of the Association of Reflexologists, said last night: ‘ Doctors would say that reflexology had nothing to do with this.

‘We don’t make any claims to cure any conditions but we have anecdotal evidence that reflexology can help with infertility problems and bring the body back into balance.’

Contact us now to book your reflexology for fertility near me

by CHRIS BROOKE, Daily Mail

Reflexology helps fertility

Background to this fertility research study

The client in this fertility research was 26 years old, had 2 children & wanted another baby.  She was slightly underweight had little energy, did not drink alcohol & was trying to stop smoking.

The client presented with a menstrual cycle of 19 days, having not ovulated for 4 months.  She was anaemic due to menorrhagia & dysmenorrhoea, a severe 8 day bleed with constant severe cramping pain.  Her menstrual cycle until 4 months previously was 24 days with a 6 day normal bleed.

Medical investigations had found nothing physically wrong and she had been offered a hysterectomy if things did not improve.  She was taking Agnes Castes on days 1 – 14 as she’d been told this may help.

A course of reflexology was agreed for this fertility research study; one reflexology session per week over two menstrual cycles followed by 2 reflexology sessions per month.  This was intended to lengthen the client’s menstrual cycle to encourage ovulation with a view to becoming pregnant.

The reflexology treatment protocol used in this fertility research

By her 3rd week of reflexology treatment, the client had started her period; however, she had no severe stomach cramps.

By reflexology session 4 the client had decided to stop taking Agnes Castes to see what effect it will have.

During her next period which started on day 26, it lasted for 6 days, it was less heavy & she only had stomach cramps on day one.  Although still feeling tired, the client was now no longer anaemic.

On reflexology session 10 the client had her next period, this started on day 27, lasted for 6 days with no pain; normal flow for the first 3 days & then very light.

In her next reflexology session, 12 weeks in to her treatment she detected ovulation on day 13. She had done 2 positive pregnancy tests, had fatigue and felt a ‘cramping’ in her belly – a sensation experienced with her last pregnancy.  She had morning sickness, aching breasts, lack of appetite & was eating fish, something she usually hates.

Outcome of the fertility research study

This fertility research study proved that after reflexology session 12 the client felt she had successfully reached her goal of pregnancy. She carried full term & gave birth to a healthy baby girl.

Fertility research paper written by Christine Richards in June 2010 edition of Association of Reflexologists magazine Understanding why reflexology may help you get pregnant.

Causes of imbalances in your body

There are a number of typical problems which can cause imbalances in the body.  These imbalances can then disrupt fertility.  Before we discuss how reflexology can help fertility, it is important to understand some of the more common problems:

*Stress related problems such as excessive worrying, or pressure at home or work.  This doesn’t necessarily have to mean you are worrying about getting pregnant as any stress can severely disrupt your body’s ability to function properly.  This can be just as important for men as well as women who are trying to conceive.

*PMS (pre menstrual syndrome) in a similar way to stress negatively affecting the body’s ability to operate from a balanced base, symptoms of PMS including being over tense, mood swings and various physical symptoms can really have an effect on your fertility levels.

*Problems with your menstrual cycle such as irregular or heavy periods or simply not ovulating make it very difficult for your body to be able to function as intended as it is dealing with more than it is often able at the sensitive time of trying to conceive.

*Adhesions (scar tissue) such as following surgery or combined with menstrual problems.

*Hormonal imbalances of oestrogen/progesterone will mean that the wall of your uterus is not building up as your body anticipates and therefore not providing the correct bedding for your egg.

*Poly cystic ovaries is a complex condition by which small cysts form on the ovaries form due to a hormone imbalance.

*Cervical problems a hormone imbalance may cause a thick cervical mucus that blocks your partners sperm as they travel along your reproductive tract.

*Blocked or damaged fallopian tubes tubes which have narrowed or are blocked as a result of scarring from infection, endometriosis, or an ectopic pregnancy may sometimes prevent fertilisation in the uterus.

*Endometriosis whereby sections of your uterine lining move through your fallopian tubes to other parts of your pelvic cavity. These fragments can bleed and cause pain during menstruation.

*Pelvic inflammatory disease is an infection of the female reproductive tract. e.g. cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries can all become inflamed.

The role of reflexology

Reflexology is very successful at relaxing the body and allowing it to re-balance by removing blockages that create a barrier to the successful elimination of toxins.  In so doing, your body may then be enabled in operating at ‘full throttle’.  The need for your body to spend its time, effort and energy working around problems such as those above may be removed through regular and sustained reflexology treatments.  This then allows your body to get on with what it hasn’t had the capacity to do before.

Does this work for men as well as women?

Yes.  The fundamental problems associated with the body being imbalanced are the same for men as they are for women.  It is these imbalances that somewhere along the line create difficulties in conceiving and reflexology is therefore just as effective on a male as it is on a female.  

Contact us now 07757 946023

Massage near me

massage near meIt’s difficult finding a massage near me. You’re never sure who is professionally approved or on the other side of the equation, who offers massage along with a whole lot more!
Well, look no further.

Charlton offers professional massage. He’s ITEC qualified, licenced massage therapist who has specialised his services in healing muscular bodywork since 2011. This is when Essential Feeling was born and began operating out of their elegant massage studio location in Gidea Park near Romford.

Essential Feeling is the baby of Charlton and his wife Karen. Together the couple adore offering customised massage and reflexology services and this is why they are accepted to treat under many of the UK’s insurance policies (please check first).

Charlton is in charge of massage and Karen the reflexology although Karen will work with clients as part of a couple’s massage as she is also trained. Together they enjoy helping clients looking for therapeutic wellness relief from real health complaints. They get a real kick out of helping people overcome their personal issue, either with relaxing treatments or through customised deep tissue work that aims to overcome chronic pain. Charlton loves the way that working with different health complaints really challenges him to get the best out of his skill set. For instance, when you have an hours massage at Essential Feeling, you will receive a totally different service if you’re looking for relief for lower back pain to how you would be treated if you have a sports injury that is preventing you from training, or gymming.

Charlton massage therapist Essential FeelingCharlton’s reviews (which sit under the Essential Feeling brand,) are second to none. Check them out on Google, and Facebook to be certain that you’re choosing to visit an experienced professional who not only knows his stuff, but is also approachable.

Being run by the two owners means that when you visit Essential Feeling, you’ll be certain of receiving a massage therapy from someone who really cares about you. You are not a number; you are a person and Charlton will seek to understand your problems and how that not only affects your lifestyle but also how your lifestyle is contributing to your problem so that he can ease your pain with massage therapy. That’s because he believes that being a licenced therapist isn’t enough, no two bodies are the same and neither are two people’s lives. So, why would your treatment plan be out of a box? You are unique and your massage therapy will be too.
All of this will be done within a casual atmosphere where certified massage professionals live and breathe anatomy and physiology.

That’s not to say that if you’re looking for a calming Swedish massage that aims to relax you and help you unwind, then Charlton is more than happy to help.
Essential Feeling massage and reflexology specialists are based in Gidea Park near Romford, Essex. They take appointments 7 days a week, from 7am to 9pm for a 10pm finish. You will benefit from free off street parking during your appointment and we hope you’ll agree with such long appointment times, you’ll be sure to find a slot that works for you.

Essential Feeling is happy to take same day appointments by text on 07941 668456, but there is no walk in facility. If you’d like to book online, then you may do so here.

Quick fire questions answered:
What is a full body massage?
This covers everything from your fingers and your toes. We’ll work your tight muscles from your aching back down to your legs, and up to your head.
Does full body massage include private parts?
Nope. Not at this establishment.
How does it cost to get a full body massage?
It depends on how much time you need as you pay us for our time, not the type of massage. Different pressure requires differing amounts of time.
The pressure may be firm as in sports massage where we firstly warm your muscles up and then break them down so they reform in a more relaxed state. Due to needing to warm up before deep tissue, we need 2 hours for this style. If you’d like a lighter, more gentle touch such as a Swedish massage then this takes less time, although to do a good job we ask for a minimum of 1.5 hours so that we can ensure you have a quality treatment.
How much is a 60 minute massage?
£65 for one hour of our time. The price increases pro rata from thereon up. The minimum time is 60 minutes. Book online here.

Best reflexology near me

If you’re looking for the best reflexology near me and you’re based in Essex then you should consider Karen Botha, a highly rated reflexologist who runs the Essential Feeling studio in Gidea Park, near Romford with her husband who is a massage therapist.

The husband and wife holistic therapy team enjoy a great track record with both massage and reflexology services sporting fabulous online reviews. Karen is a member of the Association of Reflexologists and has been practising professionally since 2011.

Best reflexology near me

Unlike many reflexologists in the area, Karen is a full time reflexologist and so not only does she have the qualifications and years of experience, but she also has seen a lot of clients over those years which has given her a wealth of therapy and wellness experience which have compounded her learning.

Experience and intuition as well as training

There is no acupressure point on the foot that Karen does not understand and know how to use to treat various conditions and diseases with reflexology. She is qualified in anatomy and physiology and understands how the different reflex points on your feet (which are used in the ancient art of reflexology) fit with conditions of the human body and then how to use these to deal with any number of varied illnesses and diseases.

Wide range of appointment slots

Karen is available for appointments 7 days a week and as long as you book in advance, her first appointment is at 7am in the morning meaning that you can come Massage and reflexology open 7 daysbefore work.

If you prefer to relax in the evenings then that’s fine too because her last appointment is 9pm for a 10pm finish giving you plenty of slots within which to visit.

Last minute appointments available

What’s more, unlike many people who offer reflexology in and near Romford, Karen is happy to take last minute appointments — before becoming a reflexologist, Karen used to work in the city, so she understands the demands that a busy schedule can place on booking therapies.

Specialisms

Karen specialises in a number of wellness issues linked the human body. She works to heal these through using pressure points on your feet. The types of issues she commonly deals with range from fertility (and pregnancy), depression and anxiety ranging up to issues such as insomnia. There is one common factor at the root of all theses issues, stress. Something which is pretty impossible to separate from our busy working lives nowadays.

What is reflexology helpful for?

Reflexology is also great for reducing inflammation. Some of the treatments e.g. fertility work alongside this benefit. So, if for instance you’re suffering with endometriosis, then acupressure points will help to relieve the pain of this. But, it’s also great if you have other health complaints which are causing you deep rooted pain. For instance, if you’re suffering with chronic back ache then reflexology is truly amazing at helping, often where traditional medicine isn’t.

All this just from the sole of your foot!

Reflexology romford essex

Counselling thrown in. If you want it!

Karen works with fertility/ infertility which in turn leads to her working with a lot of clients suffering with signs of stress/ depression. This led her to go and qualify in counselling, and so today she is also a certified counsellor.

This doesn’t mean that you need to worry about opening up if you’re not feeling it. Karen firmly believes that the hour you set aside for your reflexology is yours to do with as you choose. If you want to use that hour purely for relaxation, that’s totally fine.

Private outlet

If you decide that as part of your reflexology session you’d like a private outlet. A place where you can vent your hurt and frustrations without the risk of causing shock or offence. Karen is there for you. She’ll listen with a sympathetic ear and then help you find a way to make yourself feel better. She’s all about self healing and taking back control. Sometimes it’s easier for an outsider, removed from our personal situation, to spot a simple solution. Internally we are often drowning in confusion.

Looking forward to hearing from you

In terms of visiting Karen, you’ll find she has the best online reviews which you can check on Google and Facebook and then if you’d like to make an appointment to start your healing process while taking the opportunity to relax, please text her on 07757 946023 detailing the following:
Your name
When you’d like to book (date and time ideally)
The reason you want to book reflexology
She’ll then check her calendar and come back to you with her closest available slot.

Alternatively, if you’re ready to make your booking online, then you can do so here.